Outline Tutorial!

LISTEN AS YOU READ ALONG: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xh9I7GJHoUk
Wondering how to use writethatscene.com effectively? We’ll help with that, no problem. After going through the tutorial, IF you have any other questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Write that Scene is for individuals who are suffering from writer’s block or simply want ideas and examples for their scenes. From romance scenes, to scary scenes, we plan to add them all. But how, exactly, do YOU use writethatscene.com effectively?

The answer is simple: On every scene page there is content and examples to help you type your story. YOU DON’T HAVE TO Fill IN EVERY TEXTBOX!  When you are finished, click “combine scene” button at the bottom of the page.

Still confused? Here, let me help. For this tutorial, I will be using the saying goodbye scene template. Follow along….

For each outline page, there will be five different “functions” so to speak. The first function is numbers such as 1,2,3,4,5, etc. These numbers highlight the question that begins a segment. For example:

  1. Establish the relationship between the two (or more) characters who are saying goodbye.

— The above function, called numbers, will lay out an overview/summary of what the following functions will do. In this scene’s case, the number 1 is warning me that the characters in my scene need to already have a relationship established, either from previous chapters in my book, or from a previous page. In other words, to make this scene more emotional and gain more impact, it’s best I show the readers that the characters have a bond in place already.

For this function it is unnecessary to begin writing. This function is usually to get you thinking about what you’re about to write before you’ve even written it.

Tip: If you want, try reading every number function that is on the scene outline of choice. They will be located under each “PART”. For this particular scene the number functions will be as follows:

  1. Establish the relationship between the two (or more) characters who are saying goodbye.
  2. You should have already described the setting but this is the time to elaborate on it.
  3. What is the character thinking as they leave/ or as their love one leaves?
  4. Decide on what feelings to convey.

***

The second “function” is letters like A, B, C, D, E, etc. These letters are meant to prepare you to start typing. They are intended to get your mental juice flowing. It gets you to question your reasoning for writing this scene and helps you further add depth to its original purpose. Unlike the numbers function, the letters function allows a writer to decide what to add in their scene and what to keep out; what to reveal in their scene and what to keep a mystery. It gives authors an extra edge, so to speak.

In this outline tutorial example for the saying goodbye scene template, the letter functions are as follows:

Number 1 function has (2) letter functions–

»A.Why is this person leaving or saying goodbye?
»B.Consider what the character may leave behind.  It can either be a materialistic item, a sentimental note, or a simple, yet passionate kiss.
Number 2 function has (2) letter functions–

»A.How are they leaving? By train? By boat? Walking away? Taxi? What?
»B.How does the character try to chase after/stop their loved one?

Number 3 function has (2) letter functions–

»A.What memories come to mind?
»B.Does the character (whichever point of view you write in) have hope for the future?

Number 4  function has (2) letter functions–

»A.There are endless emotions. Angry, sadness, depression, happiness… the list goes on.
»B.Finally, remember characters are supposed to be human (mostly) so decide on how they express their emotions.

Note: It just so happens that every number function has (2) letter functions for this outline, however, in other outlines not every number function has two letter functions. They may have more or less, depending.

***

The third “function” in our outlines is roman numerals. I,II,III,IV,V, etc. This function is the meat of our outline. It gives you in-depth questions, descriptions, information, and so forth in order to write an awesome scene. We’ve gathered the relevant needed material for you to write any novel scene. Here is an example from number 1 function…. a.k.a PART 1:

I.         Are they going on a long trip or journey somewhere important? Maybe they are going to find the amulet or slay the dragon. Whatever the case may be, state it and emphasize how long until the character gets to see their loved one again.

II.        Is there a unique way they say goodbye? They can have a tradition. For instance, kiss each other on both cheeks, or have a cool handshake if they are brothers or best pals, or they can do a chest bump. (If you don’t know what I’m talking about, look it up on YouTube).

For this particular outline we now have:

Number 1 function has (2) letter functions and (4) roman numerals–

»A.Why is this person leaving or saying goodbye?

I. (See Original Outline For Text)

II. (See Original Outline For Text)
»B.Consider what the character may leave behind.  It can either be a materialistic item, a sentimental note, or a simple, yet passionate kiss.

I. (See Original Outline For Text)

II. (See Original Outline For Text)
Number 2 function has (2) letter functions and (5) roman numerals–

»A.How are they leaving? By train? By boat? Walking away? Taxi? What?

I. (See Original Outline For Text)

II. (See Original Outline For Text)

»B.How does the character try to chase after/stop their loved one?

I. (See Original Outline For Text)

II. (See Original Outline For Text)

III. (See Original Outline For Text)

Number 3 function has (2) letter functions and (4) roman numerals–

»A.What memories come to mind?

I. (See Original Outline For Text)

II. (See Original Outline For Text)
»B.Does the character (whichever point of view you write in) have hope for the future?

I. (See Original Outline For Text)

II. (See Original Outline For Text)

Number 4  function has (2) letter functions and (5) roman numerals–

»A.There are endless emotions. Angry, sadness, depression, happiness… the list goes on.

I. (See Original Outline For Text)

II. (See Original Outline For Text)

III. (See Original Outline For Text)

»B.Finally, remember characters are supposed to be human (mostly) so decide on how they express their emotions.

I. (See Original Outline For Text)

II. (See Original Outline For Text)

Note: Each roman numeral will have context and guided information for you to use. Keep in mind that for this tutorial we have excluded the text.

***

The fourth “function” is the text box.

The text box is for you to begin your creativity. Start writing whatever flows to your mind. Use the context, the information, and the descriptions from the roman numeral  “function” to help whip out your scene. Don’t be afraid, don’t think twice… just write! And, if you need an example, we provide one under the text box. (But note, not every text box has an example underneath.)

***

The fifth and final “function” is the combine your scene button as well as the click for full example button.


!You might have to scroll down the textbox with your mouse!


This function allows you to combine your scene. It will collect everything you have written and put it in a nice format, with paragraphs. !You might have to scroll down the textbox with your mouse! means that if your text is cut off, click your mouse in the text box and scroll down. The rest of it should be there.

 

Note: This function does not check spelling and grammar and it does not create the scene for you. It is simply a tool for writers to use in order to avoid copying from every textbox and pasting into Word or your blog. That can get tedious!

 

The full example button speaks for itself. If you just want to read a full example of the scene, click it.
***
Of course, you can go about doing this any way you like. This tutorial is only a suggestion of how you should use the website. Now that you are aware of how to use the outline templates, please feel free to try it out yourself using the outline we just used or any other outline template for that matter.
And, if you have any questions, comments or concerns… or you would like to request an outline that is not currently available, please use our contact us page. If you are unable to do so, leave a comment below. We will get back to you as soon as possible. Thanks for reading and have a wonderful writing day!

May Your Writing Spirit Live On Forever

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5 Comments

  1. Quick Overview!
    We’ve broken the process out into an outline format, and provide a basic 3-level outline. The highest level, represented by the numbers 1,2,3,4,5 etc. The next level, represented by A,B,C,D,E, etc. The lowest level, represented by Roman numerals, is where the action takes place.

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